Tag: Music News

Nyle DiMarco Remade Ariana Grande’s “7 Rings” Music Video in American Sign Language

“Ariana dropped 7rings with captions, we dropped in SIGN LANGUAGE.”

Fans of Ariana Grande may have to wait until February 8 for her newest album to drop, but thanks to Nyle DiMarco we’ve officially received an epic — and jewel-studded — take on Ari’s latest single “7 Rings.” Just days after releasing the neon pink–hued video, the America’s Next Top Modelwinner unveiled his own video version of the track, complete with American Sign Language.

Nyle, who has remained outspoken about providing closed-captioning in both movies and music, released his remake (which was directed by Jake Wilson) on Monday. He wrote on Twitter, “@arianagrande dropped 7rings with captions, we dropped in SIGN LANGUAGE.”

The release of Nyle’s video comes after the model had previously asked for VEVO and Ariana to provide captions on the singer’s “thank u, next” video. At the time, he explained the reasoning for his request, writing, “You earn more than 650 mill per year and can’t even add captions to @ArianaGrande’s #ThankUNextVideo. There ARE closed caption services that will cost you ONLY $6 (or less) to INSTANTLY appeal to a wider audience There are 466mill people with hearing loss thank u, next.” The “7 Rings” video was subsequently released with captions available. In addition to making Ariana’s music even more accessible to people who are deaf, Nyle’s signed music video has also earned the seal of approval from Ariana herself. The singer responded to the release on January 28, tweeting, “beyond 🖤 love this so much.” And while Nyle’s version of the video is abbreviated, it does include plenty of references to the original, including one scene that has the model posing on countertops à la Ari.

Along with earning the support of Ariana, fans on social media also shared their appreciation for Nyle’s video. “As a member of the deaf community, I STAN,” one follower tweeted. Another follower then shared their excitement, writing, “Wow Nyleeeeee finally something on trend I can share with my mom!! This made me so happy you’re such a firecracker. You did that!!!!” And with a new Ariana album just around the corner, we’re hoping that maybe these two can collaborate on something in the future.

Fat Joe Comments on Eric Benet’s Post About Rappers Destroying Their Own People

A few days ago, R&B veteran Eric Benet posted a photo on his Instagram profile, which read: “If all you rap about is “killing black people,” “degrading black women,” “abusing drugs,” “materialization,” and “living a low life” – you are not an artist, you are a black face for white supremacy. You are being used to help destroy your own people.”

The post generated opinions from many fans, some who agree and some who don’t. Rapper Fat Joe gave his two cents after a TMZ cameraman asked him to comment on the post by Benet.

“That’s his opinion. I view music as entertainment, man. It’s just entertainment,” Joe says in the below video. “We have different rappers with different messages. It’s all entertainment. If you’re gonna go and you’re gonna live your life behind a rap song, then you’re the fool. …We make gangsta rap people go work out to. People in the Army, Navy, fighting wars, they get hype to our shit.”

Joe also added, “I don’t know what he’s talking about. It’s a shame. I love Eric Benét.”

Rapper Wale also commented on the post, insisting, “Hip-hop always had an affinity for material things,” he wrote in TSR’s comments. “It’s a part of the very fabric (no pun) but does not define the players IN said genre.”

Thoughts?

The Musicians Behind Your Favorite Songs Are Coming for Their Credit

Who made the beat for “Bad and Boujee”? It should be a simple question. Most rap beat-hustlefans (and media outlets) would answer, without hesitation, Metro Boomin. But that’s not the full story. The songwriting credits list a Robert Mandell, better known as G Koop. And that leads us to a not-very-well-known side of how hip-hop works. Koop is a musician who has worked on tracks for the biggest names in the business. 2 Chainz, Future, Migos, DJ Khaled, 21 Savage, Meek Mill, and more have all relied on his tunes. So why don’t you hear his name everywhere? It’s because Koop is part of a new breed of musicians and composers, many of them managed by the same veteran Shady Records exec, who have quietly played a major part in creating the biggest records of recent years—and now they’re coming for their credit.

CONTINUE READING:https://www.complex.com/music/2018/07/musicians-behind-favorite-songs-coming-for-their-credit/

Future: Syrup, Strippers and Heavy Angst With the Superstar MC

“I embraced what I thought people was gonna hate about me. I was gonna turn the hate into love”

future3Outside, it’s rush hour, a still-sunny spring evening in Atlanta, but in here, you’d never know it. This room is windowless and dark, illuminated only by a projector shooting shimmering green stars onto the ceiling, a computer monitor displaying Pro Tools, and the glowing rack of gear beneath it. The air seems composed mostly of high-grade kush smoke, accompanied by just enough oxygen to sustain life. On a shelf in the corner are liter bottles of sugary sodas – Sprite, Pineapple Sunkist, Strawberry Fanta – mixers for a bottle of codeine cough syrup adorned with a picture of Homer Simpson.

This control room and its adjoining vocal booth, in a gated studio complex on an industrial road a couple of miles from downtown, is the workplace of choice for Atlanta’s reigning hip-hop king, Future. Six feet three with long, blond-tipped dreads, top-notch cheekbones and the sleepy swagger of the high school athlete he once was, he looks less like an actual rapper than a movie star cast as one. Even leaked mug shots from his pre-fame hustling days look like outtakes from magazine shoots. He has a big, bright leading-man smile that he holds in reserve, unleashing it most consistently in the presence of attractive women.

future

He’s puffing on a blunt, taking a sip or two from a Styrofoam cup of the narcotic beverage mostly known to hip-hop fans as “lean” or “drank” or “sizzurp” before he helped rebrand it as “dirty Sprite.” With his lyrical salutes to Xanax, codeine, Adderall and Oxycontin, he’s one of the first rappers who could conceivably sign a sponsorship deal with Big Pharma: “I just took a piss and I seen codeine coming out,” he rapped not long ago. He considers himself a rock star, and he’s dressed like one: pale jeans, strategically shredded, with a plaid shirt tied at his waist and a crisp white tee. (The following day, he wears a $435 T-shirt by the high-end brand Enfants Riches Déprimés, emblazoned with the words “high risk/children without a conscience.”)

READ MORE:https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/future-syrup-strippers-and-heavy-angst-with-the-superstar-mc-113132/