One day, many realities, as COVID-19 cuts an uneven swath across L.A.

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The pandemic may have slowed the city, but it hasn’t stopped it.

Starting well before dawn, essential workers toil at factories and markets and restaurants. Some remain deep into the night; the lucky ones work from home. Parks and beaches and hiking trails beckon those desperate for a break.

But COVID-19 has not been an equal-opportunity scourge. Those who see no choice but to work outside their homes are far more exposed than those who have the luxury of sheltering in place. Those in crowded households are far more likely to fall ill than those who live alone or in small families.

A Times analysis, based on Los Angeles County data, shows that someone living in the heavily immigrant Pico-Union neighborhood, for example, is seven times more likely to contract the disease — and 35 times more likely to die — than someone in relatively affluent Agoura Hills.

The Times sent reporters across the city to capture one day, Wednesday, in the life of the coronavirus pandemic. Here is what they found:

4 a.m. | Los Angeles Flower Mart

Sunrise Wholesale Flowers at The Original Los Angeles Flower Market

Most of Los Angeles was still asleep, but the heart of L.A.’s flower district on Wall Street was already full of life — of both the human and plant variety — a cacophony of color. Buckets of lilies, roses, baby’s breath, chrysanthemums, sunflowers, hydrangeas and daisies were being carted through the cavernous Original Los Angeles Flower Market.

The market reopened May 7 after being shut for two months due to COVID-19.

“We are all adjusting to the new norm,” said Qiana Rivera, as she separated bunches of green fronds. One of the market’s vendors, Rivera is grateful to be back at work. “It was so nice to come back and see our regular customers.”

But it’s been challenging too. Many vendors, like David Ramirez, say business has suffered tremendously. Ramirez is barely breaking even: “We are just trying to survive,” he said.

Summer is typically peak wedding season, a lucrative time for the flower market, but most gatherings and celebrations have been postponed or canceled. “This should be a good season for us, but we are really struggling,” Ramirez said.

It’s not just the sellers who are having difficulties. During the two-month shutdown, growers across California threw out thousands of flowers and lost millions of dollars.

Many Flower Market customers are florists doing their best to drum up work despite the decline in events, but individual shoppers have also begun to visit the market again too.

Charlotte Redmond, a phlebotomist who is now testing people for COVID-19, stopped by before work.

She was browsing the house plants, looking for pothos and air plants. “Testing for COVID all day is wearing me out,” Redmond said. “My happy place is my garden now — the plants make me feel peaceful.”

Strippers Are Doing It for Themselves

Around 10 most nights, Nikeisah Newton hops into her car for a 10-minute drive into downtown Portland, Ore., so that she can deliver healthy meals that include ingredients like massaged kale to strippers working the evening shift. “One of the best forms of activism is feeding people,” Ms. Newton said. Her company is called Meals 4 Six Inch Heels, and it’s intended to support a community that she feels has been shunned and taken advantage of for too long.

Ms. Newton, whose ex-girlfriend is a former stripper, has joined a wave of dancers and their allies across the nation who are fighting to reform labor practices; put an end to sexual harassment and discrimination in their workplaces; and stifle the stigma around what they believe is as legitimate a profession as any.

Members of this movement are sharing their experiences with the public through podcasts, books and visual arts; using technology to spread information about their industry; and protesting injustices in the streets. They are also finding ways to care for each other, with meal-delivery services, yoga classes, book clubs, clothing lines with slogans of solidarity, financial planning lessons and comedy workshops.

When you use the word “platform” now in the stripping community, it’s as likely to refer to social media as shoes. At V-Live in Los Angeles, guests are encouraged to use their phones to take videos and photos of the dancers. On a recent evening, a photographer circled the dancers, taking images that they could later buy to use on their Instagram accounts.

The water-cooler conversations in the 1980s and ’90s, with the mainstream movies “Flashdance,” “Showgirls” and “Striptease,” may be coming back, as strippers return to the big screen in September with “Hustlers,” about dancers who steal money from their rich customers.

The film features the celebrities Jennifer Lopez, Lizzo and Constance Wu. Cardi B, a megastar, takes pride in and has spoken positively about her experiences with stripping. Beyoncé’s best-selling album, “Lemonade,” has a song called “6 Inch” about working as a stripper. Magic City and other clubs in Atlanta are well known among hip-hop fans as places where musicians test out new songs.

And across America, the face of stripping, and its audience, is changing. No longer the domain solely of finance bros and the like unwinding after hours, strip clubs these days are also frequented by couples and friends.

“Our audiences in the last 10 years, specific to my home club, have become more diverse, younger, more gender broad,” said Elle Stanger, 32, who has worked as a stripper for a decade and lives in Portland. “It’s not just middle-aged white men anymore.”

Drake Deserves Nod For Album of the Year

“Nothing Was The Same” is by far the best rap/R&B album of 2013- a bold statement with several big names dropping records in 2013. Drake raps and sings over tremendous beats and offers lyrics much deeper and personal than recent releases by kingpins Jay-Z and Kanye West. “Hold On, We’re Going Home” and “Started From The Bottom” show the two sides of Drake: a singer with talent to top R&B charts, and a rapper with the charisma and energy to dominate the club scene.

The album boasts great songs on both sides of the spectrum and truly can be enjoyed from start to finish. Drake displays his conversational style rapping and as we have grown accustomed to, he questions the pleasures of fame while also enjoying the limelight. The album truly sounds like a Greatest Hits compilation and should earn some recognition as the best of 2013.

Win, Fail, or Racist?

More than 111 million people tuned into the 2012 Super Bowl, the most-watched program in television history. Sunday night could be another record-breaker.

The commercials that air during the game are becoming a large part of the Super Bowl experience and companies will pay top dollar to be included. CBS sold out its ad inventory for Super Bowl XLVII at prices averaging between $3.7 million and $3.8 million for each spot, according to Ad Age.

The commercials will make some people laugh, some people cry and infuriate others.

Take a look at the commercials listed and tell us if you think they’re a win, a big fail or racist.

Read it at Colorlines.

PACKER SHOES X ADIDAS TOP TEN 2000 “2WO 1NE”

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Iman Shumpert unveiled this wildly bright colorway of the adidas Top Ten 2000 last season before going down with an injury against the Miami Heat. While adidas might be campaigning #thereturn with Derrick Rose, Knicks fans are anticipating a return of their future All-Star anytime now as well. Meanwhile, Shumpert’s bright orange retros will help fans celebrate his return to the hardwood. Releasing at 21:21 on January 21 is the “2WO 1NE” (Iman’s jersey number) edition of the adidas Top Ten 2000. These special edition adidas are limited to just 500 pairs worldwide and individually numbered. They will retail for $140 and be available at Packer Shoes.