Tag: DRAKE

Drake Was Isolated (at the Top) Way Before Quarantine

“Dark Lane Demo Tapes” is a collection of rough drafts about the struggles of success and hints at what his next album might sound like.

Credit Drake for being both the most sonically consistent pop star of the last decade and also a work in progress. From album to album, year to year, he draws from a standard palette of moody R&B and puffed-chest rap, emotionally charged hip-hop and muscular soul. But at the same time, he’s always slathering his approach atop new inputs: dancehall, grime, Houston rap, Afrobeats and beyond. Unlike many of his peers, he’ll put his credibility on the line for a chance to absorb and repurpose new sounds.

Which is why “Dark Lane Demo Tapes” — a largely effective album-length odds-and-ends collection but not, you know, an album — may be more valuable as data than as songs. As music, it’s a mostly sharp document of top-dog anxiety and solipsism. But it’s also perhaps a spoiler for the proper album Drake announced will be released this summer,his first since the blustery “Scorpion” in 2018.

“Dark Lane” shows Drake songs at various developmental points — full-fledged experiments in a range of regional and microscene styles, half-cooked ideas from old projects, classicist exercises, formal rhymes, informal rhymes. Omnivorous and osmotic, he feels his way around new production styles and tries out new flow patterns, attempting to make them jibe with the soft-edged style he excels at.

“War” is a U.K. drill song, ominous and sneering and full of deeply studied slang. “Demons” explores Brooklyn drill, a little jumpier than its overseas cousin. (It features two of that scene’s up and comers, Fivio Foreign and Sosa Geek.) “Toosie Slide,” which recently went to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 thanks to its baked-in virality, is a quasi-dance song. And “Pain 1993,” a long-promised collaboration with Playboi Carti, is a chance for Drake to ably mimic his collaborator’s chirps.

READ MORE: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/06/arts/music/drake-dark-lane-demo-tapes-review.html?action=click&module=Editors%20Picks&pgtype=Homepage

A decade later, Drake’s ‘So Far Gone’ mixtape hits streaming services

On the heels of his Grammy win for Best Rap Song, Drake revealed on Instagram that his 2009 mixtape So Far Gone is coming to streaming services for the first time. Though it was originally available for free online, this marks the first streaming availability for the 18-track collection that features cameos from Lil Wayne, Santigold, Trey Songz, Bun B and more. The mixtape also includes the single “Say What’s Real,” which was produced by Kanye West.

So Far Gone not only turns 10 on February 13th, but it’s also a body of work that helped put Drake on the map. These early works don’t always make it to your go-to streaming service, especially when it comes to hip hop mixtapes, so it’s always nice when they do. You also won’t have to wait to get re-acquainted as Champagne Papi explained that the mixtape will be available to stream tomorrow, February 14th.

Childish Gambino makes Grammy history

(CNN) Childish Gambino’s “This Is America” won Grammys for song and record of the year on Sunday, becoming the first rap song to win the prestigious awards.The artist — also known as the mutitalented Donald Glover — did not attend the event and reportedly declined an invitation to perform at the Grammys.”This Is America” beat out “Shallow,” “God’s Plan” and other big hits. The Grammy for song of the year honors song writers, while record of the year goes to the recording artist.

The song caused a stir last May when Gambino released its ambitious video, which was full of racial symbolism.Related: ‘This Is America’: The Childish Gambino video explainedThe Recording Academy has made an effort to diversify its membership amid complaints the Grammys have frequently failed to recognize rap and hip-hop artists in the major categories.Earlier this week in an interview with the New York Times, longtime Grammy producer Ken Ehrlich acknowledged, “We continue to have a problem in the hip-hop world.”It’s unclear if Childish Gambino’s wins on Sunday change that.

Funkmaster Flex Seems to Take Shots at Drake Again: ‘You Ain’t Qualified to Give Rules’

Though the conflict between Drake and Pusha-T has been wrapped up, one popular conversation birthed from the feud is the existence of rules (if any) in rap beef. Drake’s appearance on HBO’s The Shop spawned a debate across hip-hop, as he stated that certain lines shouldn’t be crossed in rap. Rappers and music industry individuals attempted to argue on both sides, though no general consensus was established.

While still on promo for their Beloved project, Dave East and Styles P (who both recently gave their opinion on the topic) stopped by radio veteran/media personality Funkmaster Flex‘s show on Hot 97. At the end of the video above, around the 6:09 mark, Flex took the time to go on an explicative filled rant addressing the issue of those who seek to establish guidelines in lyrical warfare.

Flex, in his usual candid, unabashed fashion, made his stance unequivocally clear.

“If you get your feelings hurt, fuck you, it don’t really matter,” he began. “If you don’t write your own shit, you ain’t qualified to give motherfucking rules on the fucking game, you fucking bozo.”

The sentiment Flex expressed echoes that of an earlier statement made by Styles regarding the Drake/Pusha T incident. Styles told Hot 97 “you can’t expect in any type of warfare, any type, not just rap, ain’t no rules.”

This isn’t the first time Flex has addressed Drake, as his disdain with the Canadian superstar has always been about the actions taken by Drake that are contrarian to the hip-hop purist (i.e. the infamous Quentin Miller reference tracks).

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Here Exactly How Much the Shiggy Challenge Impacted the Success of DRAKE In My Feelings

drake

The answer to the question “Kiki, do you love me?” appears to be a resounding “Yes.”

The viral dance challenge started by Instagram star Shiggy for Drake’s Kiki interrogation “In My Feelings” has been adopted by everyone from Leslie Jones to Will Smith, pushing the bounce-flavored song to the forefront of the pop culture conversation, and to number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Even Drizzy himself acknowledged that Shiggy’s dance challenge played a major part in making the track a hit.

READ MORE: https://www.complex.com/music/2018/07/how-much-do-viral-challenges-help

watch: drake premieres a new track at the louis vuitton paris menswear show

Drake joined designer Kim Jones for a spot of fashionable island-hopping today, the 6 God premiering a brand new track inspired by the Louis Vuitton spring/summer 18 menswear collection as models walked the runway at the show in Paris.

Dubbed “Archipelago,” the collection is inspired by travel and remote islands. “Someone gave me the book Atlas of Remote Islands: Fifty Islands I Have Not Visited and Never Will. And I realized I’d been to about all of them!” Kim Jones says in a statement. “I thought of specific islands — New Zealand, Easter Island, and especially Hawaii — but I was also inspired by the idea of an island, and of travel. Of moving easily from place to place, and experiencing these different pockets of civilization, these different identities simultaneously.”

There fresh new takes on the Maison’s signature Aloha shirts, with outdoor sports influences, and plenty of desirable luggage via reworkings of the iconic Louis Vuitton trunk. As for the footwear, it crossbreeds “clogs with hiking boots, Harajuku with Honolulu.”

Revealing the Drake collaboration on Instagram last night, Kim wrote, “We are very proud to announce that Drake @champagnepapi will be premiering a brand new song inspired by our #louisvuitton #pfwSS18 collection,” with Drizzy himself noting in a similar post that the track is produced by “@OVO40,” AKA Noah Shebib.

Drake Deserves Nod For Album of the Year

“Nothing Was The Same” is by far the best rap/R&B album of 2013- a bold statement with several big names dropping records in 2013. Drake raps and sings over tremendous beats and offers lyrics much deeper and personal than recent releases by kingpins Jay-Z and Kanye West. “Hold On, We’re Going Home” and “Started From The Bottom” show the two sides of Drake: a singer with talent to top R&B charts, and a rapper with the charisma and energy to dominate the club scene.

The album boasts great songs on both sides of the spectrum and truly can be enjoyed from start to finish. Drake displays his conversational style rapping and as we have grown accustomed to, he questions the pleasures of fame while also enjoying the limelight. The album truly sounds like a Greatest Hits compilation and should earn some recognition as the best of 2013.