Tag: boxing

Canelo vs Jacobs Live on DAZN

When Saul “Canelo” Alvarez and Daniel Jacobs enter the ring at Las Vegas’ T-Mobile Arena on May 4, the bout will represent more than a pair of world champions squaring off. Two distinct cultures will literally come face-to-face.

Canelo, 28, the highest-paid boxer in the world, will ignite his Mexican fan base as he tries to legitimize his place as one of the all-time greatest pound-for-pound fighters. A victory means he’ll hold five middleweight title belts (WBA, WBC, The Ring, Lineal, and IBF) at once, placing him in rarefied air.

Across the ring, Jacobs, 32, the “Miracle Man” cancer survivor from Brooklyn, has a chance to shift the boxing power dynamic to the East Coast. With a stellar 35-2 record and the IBF middleweight championship around his waist, his talent is evident but a marquee win is still lacking. Defeating Canelo, who has a five-year, 11-fight, $365 million deal with sports subscription streaming service DAZN (pronounced “Da-Zone,”) changes that narrative for Jacobs. It would make him, arguably, the best middleweight fighter on the planet. Not to mention, he’d strut back into NYC with a whole bunch of belts to show for it.

The differences between the fighters go beyond in-ring tactics and accolades. Their journeys, culminating in the big-time, early spring showdown, feature personal hardships, agonizing defeats, and triumphant victories that helped lay the groundwork for a unique tale of the tape. Here’s how Canelo and Jacobs match up.

Following the Mayweather Model, Errol Spence Jr. Wants to be Boxing’s Next PPV Star

When you block off almost an hour to sit down and chat with Errol Spence Jr., the first question you ask yourself is: How can it possibly go the distance?

For the briefest of seconds, you’re almost (and I can’t stress almost enough) in the same shoes as the IBF welterweight champion’s overmatched opponents. One of the best pound-for-pound boxers in the world hasn’t seen the final round of a fight since 2014. He’s too good, too fundamentally sound, too devastatingly powerful for his bouts to last all 12 rounds these days. But as much noise as he’s generated inside the ring the last few years, outside of it, the 28-year-old from Desoto, Texas, keeps it quiet.

“This man talks with his action,” says Lennox Lewis, the former undisputed heavyweight champion of the world. “He doesn’t need to do much talking.”  

It’s an atypical rainy winter day in downtown Los Angeles when Spence, the best boxer in the sport’s best division, rolls up to the Presidential Suite of the NoMad Hotel. With only two pals in tow, the reserved and soft-spoken champ, rocking designer duds and an absurdly expensive watch that glistens every time he moves his wrist, doesn’t attract too much attention. And that’s just fine with him. One of his idols might be Floyd Mayweather Jr., but you’ll never confuse the two, since Spence doesn’t take social media too seriously, keeps the bragging to a minimum, and almost never calls out another fighter.

But entering the most important year of his career, Spence might have to change his ways. For starters, the mild-mannered pugilist needs to endear himself to a bigger audience than boxing’s hardcore fans before his highly-anticipated fight with Mikey Garcia on March 16 at the AT&T Stadium in Dallas. That’s because the bigger goal, for him, is to become boxing’s next pay-per-view star. “I don’t think I’ve officially arrived yet,” says Spence. But entering 2019, he’d like everyone to know he’s on “the brink of my superstardom.”

“When you watch him you’re pleased because he’s doing everything you want a boxer of his caliber to do. He can be a really big superstar.” – FORMER UNIDISPUTED HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION LENNOX LEWIS

If you haven’t been paying attention, Spence has rapidly become one of the baddest men on the planet. His fists either put opponents on the mat or make their corners throw in the towel. A southpaw who is bigger than many welterweights, Spence bristles when people label him a brawler because he prides himself on being a well-rounded fighter. He can counterpunch. He’s a sound defender. His body work usually leaves his opponents buckled. You see the brilliance as he strategically takes them apart. READ MORE: https://www.complex.com/sports/2019/01/errol-spence-jr-wants-to-be-boxings-next-ppv-star

Sylvester Stallone Hints at Possible Adonis/Apollo Creed-Drago ‘Creed 2’ Storyline

While we’ve all been in a tizzy over Ryan Coogler’s upcoming “Black Panther” since the first trailer dropped last month, and the recent announcement that he’s reuniting with Michael B. Jordan on a drama titled “Wrong Answer,” to be scripted by Ta-Nehisi Coates, with Brad Pitt’s Plan B producing, we may have forgotten that a sequel to “Creed” is also coming. Our last update on this was in January of 2016, when MGM CEO Gary Barber revealed in a Variety interview: “There’s no doubt that we’re making a ‘Creed 2’.”
Although the question at the time, and one that still remains unanswered is whether Coogler, who directed “Creed,” will also direct “Creed 2” since he’s been tied up with “Black Panther,” and will continue to be through early next year, with the aforementioned “Wrong Answer” possibly becoming what he tackles next.

“I know Ryan is probably going to be gone for a couple years,” said Stallone in January 2016, adding, “So there will be a quandary on: Do we work with another director and have Ryan produce, or do we wait? There’s a diminishing time acceptance of a sequel. Now they are cranking them out in a year.” As for what the story will be, Stallone shared, “One version of the story would take place in the past… bringing back Carl Weathers to play Apollo Creed,” who died in 1985’s “Rocky IV” at the hands of Ivan Drago of the former Soviet Union, portrayed by Dolph Lundgren.

Stallone said at the time that he “recently bumped into” Carl Weathers and he was impressed that he was still in “good shape.” Another potential story for “Creed 2” shared in the same 2016 interview: “… a linear story with Apollo’s son Adonis (Michael B. Jordan) taking on another challenger.” Stallone explained: “You’ll have him face a different opponent, which I would say is a more ferocious, big Russian… You can start to meld my experiences and then you start to bring different cultures into it. And you can see what’s happening with the Russians today in America. The complication will come with the girl’s ambition, because she’s not Adrian. She has places to go, things to see, the clock is running on her hearing.” “The girl” he’s referring to is Tessa Thompson’s Bianca, who Shannon Houston wrote about wonderfully (here) as a potential star of any “Creed” sequel.

“Ryan has some ideas of going forward and backward and actually seeing Rocky and Apollo together,” Stallone said, adding, “Think of ‘The Godfather 2.’ That’s what he was thinking of, which was kind of ambitious.” Skip ahead to this past weekend, to Stallone’s Instagram account, where he appears to be hinting at other story possibilities for “Creed 2.” To wit…

Muhammad Ali, Titan of Boxing and the 20th Century, Dies at 74

28

Muhammad Ali, the three-time world heavyweight boxing champion who helped define his turbulent times as the most charismatic and controversial sports figure of the 20th century, died on Friday. He was 74.

His death was confirmed by Bob Gunnell, a family spokesman.

Ali was the most thrilling if not the best heavyweight ever, carrying into the ring a physically lyrical, unorthodox boxing style that fused speed, agility and power more seamlessly than that of any fighter before him.

But he was more than the sum of his athletic gifts. An agile mind, a buoyant personality, a brash self-confidence and an evolving set of personal convictions fostered a magnetism that the ring alone could not contain. He entertained as much with his mouth as with his fists, narrating his life with a patter of inventive doggerel. (“Me! Wheeeeee!”)

Ali was as polarizing a superstar as the sports world has ever produced — both admired and vilified in the 1960s and ’70s for his religious, political and social stances. His refusal to be drafted during the Vietnam War, his rejection of racial integration at the height of the civil rights movement, his conversion from Christianity to Islam and the changing of his “slave” name, Cassius Clay, to one bestowed by the separatist black sect he joined, the Lost-Found Nation of Islam, were perceived as serious threats by the conservative establishment and noble acts of defiance by the liberal opposition.

Loved or hated, he remained for 50 years one of the most recognizable people on the planet.

Floyd Mayweather Jr. Defeats Miguel Cotto With Unanimous Decison

LAS VEGAS — Floyd Mayweather Jr. used his speed and accuracy to win a unanimous decision Saturday night over a game Miguel Cotto in one of his toughest fights ever. Mayweather dominated late, rocking Cotto in the 12th round to pull out a win and remain unbeaten in 43 fights. But it wasn’t easy, with Mayweather getting his nose bloodied and Cotto fighting until the final bell. Two judges scored the fight 117-111 and the third had it 118-110. The Associated Press had Mayweather winning 116-112. “You’re a hell of a champion,” Mayweather told Cotto in the ring afterward. “You’re the toughest guy I ever fought.” Fighting just a few weeks before he enters a county jail to serve a three-month sentence for domestic abuse, Mayweather found himself in a tough fight against a game opponent who never stopped moving forward. But he was faster and more accurate than Cotto and seemed to wear him down in the final rounds. In the last round, Mayweather landed his best punch of the night, a left uppercut that seemed to hurt Cotto. He followed that with several flurries to the head to wrap up a decision that until the later rounds had been in doubt. The decision was roundly booed by the crowd at the MGM Grand arena, which cheered wildly every time Cotto landed a punch. “He’s a tough competitor,” Mayweather said. “He came to fight, he didn’t just come to survive. I dug down and fought him back.” Mayweather, who was guaranteed $32 million, was forced to fight every minute of all 12 rounds against the Puerto Rican champion. He did it after weighing in at 151 pounds, the heaviest he has ever been for a fight.

Read More: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/06/floyd-mayweather-jr-vs-miguel-cotto-fight-decision_n_1487087.html