Day: September 16, 2018

Eminem – Lucky You ft. Joyner Lucas

From the album Kamikaze, out now: http://shady.sr/Kamikaze http://eminem.com http://facebook.com/eminem http://twitter.com/eminem http://instagram.com/eminem http://eminem.tumblr.com http://shadyrecords.com http://facebook.com/shadyrecords http://twitter.com/shadyrecords http://instagram.com/shadyrecords http://trustshady.tumblr.com Music video by Eminem performing Lucky You. © 2018 Aftermath Records

Best 50 Plays of the 2018 NBA Regular Season

Getting ready for the 2018-2019 Season the hardwood is about to squeak again, enjoy some highlights from last season.
Enjoy the best 50 plays from the 2018 NBA regular season, featuring LeBron James, Giannis Antetokounmpo, James Harden, and more! Subscribe to the NBA: http://bit.ly/2rCglzY For news, stories, highlights and more, go to our official website at http://www.nba.com Get NBA LEAGUE PASS: http://www.nba.com/leaguepass

Pathologists shortage ‘delaying cancer diagnosis’

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Patients are facing delays in diagnosis because of severe shortages among pathology staff, according to a report seen by the BBC.

A survey by the Royal College of Pathologists found only 3% of the NHS histopathology departments that responded had enough staff.

Histopathologists are doctors and scientists who diagnose and study diseases such as cancer.

Hundreds more pathologists are now working in the NHS, health chiefs said.

‘Staffing gaps’

The new report by the Royal College of Pathologists says that demand for pathology services has grown significantly in recent years, but staffing has not increased at the same rate.

It carried out a workforce survey of histopathology departments throughout the UK in 2017.

Of the 158 departments, 103 responded.

Only 3% said they had enough staff to meet current clinical demand.

And 45% of departments had to outsource work while half of departments were forced to use locums.

“The cost of staff shortages across histopathology departments is high for both patients and for our health services.

“For patients, it means worrying delays in diagnosis and treatment,” said Prof Jo Martin, president of the Royal College of Pathologists.

“We estimate the cost of locums and outsourcing work is £27m each year across the UK health service, money that could be better invested in staff and new diagnostic equipment” she added.

READ MORE:https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-45497014

5 Hip-Hop Artists That Went Against Industry Norms to Achieve Success

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Hip-hop has never been about following rules. From the genre’s birth in the late ‘70s to today’s explosion of innovative pop-rap superstars, the music has always rewarded audacious creativity and outside-the-box thinking. While hip-hop has gone mainstream and become the world’s preeminent form of popular music, there are still artists working outside of industry boundaries and refusing to let labels, managers, or anyone influence their art. Below, we give props to five uncompromising artists who’ve found their own lanes and chased greatness on their own terms.

Dessa: A Multifaceted Artist with a Singular Voice
Before launching her career as a rapper, singer, spoken-word artist, author, and Doomtree label head, the Minneapolis native born Margaret Wander worked as a technical writer for a medical company. In a sense, she’s come full-circle with Chime, the critically acclaimed album she released in early 2018. It’s Dessa’s fourth collection of smart, soulful alternative hip-hop songs, and it was inspired by a project whereby she collaborated with neuroscientists to pinpoint the exact part of her brain dedicated to romantic love. Chime is just the latest example of how this one-time philosophy major has challenged the idea of what a female hip-hop artist can be. In a 2018 interview with Billboard, Dessa shared her secret for having such a rich and varied career: “I worry a little bit less about trying to forestall people’s opinions and just try to do good work.”

Cardi B: A Personality Too Big to Fail
By the time Cardi B topped the Billboard Hot 100 in 2017 with “Bodak Yellow,” the Bronx native was already on her fourth career. In the years leading up to her musical breakthrough, Cardi went from stripping to making viral videos to stealing scenes on Vh1’s Love & Hip Hop: New York. All of those pursuits showcased the qualities that would make Cardi one of the most exciting new rappers of the ‘10s. Cardi is sexy and funny, outrageous and vulnerable, tough as hell yet instantly loveable. Her excellent 2018 debut album, Invasion of Privacy, reached #1 on the Billboard 200 and silenced critics who thought she’d be a one-hit wonder. Invasion of Privacy has spawned a second chart-topper, the Latin-flavored “I Like It,” which you’ve surely heard blasting from cars all summer. While pregnancy kept Cardi from touring in recent months, motherhood is only going to make this vivacious truth-spitter a more compelling artist in years to come.

Tyler The Creator: More Than Just a Troublemaker
When the Odd Future collective came on the scene in 2010, nobody knew what to make of them. The blog-hyped L.A. rappers became infamous for their offensive lyrics, chaotic life shows, and unwillingness to play by anyone’s rules. Leading the pack was Tyler The Creator, a multifaceted troublemaker who’d spend the next decade revealing his genius. In addition to overseeing numerous Odd Future releases and four solo LPs — including last year’s Grammy-nominated Flower Boy — Tyler has directed music videos, launched his own Golf Wang clothing line, and spearheaded the Camp Flog Gnaw Carnival music festival. Tyler’s extracurriculars make it easy to overlook his rapping, but the fact is that he’s a stellar MC with the power to make you feel all sorts of ways. On Flower Boy, Tyler surprised everyone by serving up his most mature, confessional lyrics to date. Tyler sums up his career perfectly on the song “Who Dat Boy,” asking, “Who dat boy? Who him is?” The world will be chewing on those questions for quite a while.

Curren$y: The Underground Hero Who Never Lets You Down
The New Orleans rapper born Shante Scott Franklin knows how the big boys operate. He signed with Master P’s No Limit label in 2002, then struck a deal with Lil Wayne’s Cash Money Records in 2004. Curren$y appeared on Weezy’s Tha Carter II in 2005 and dropped the minor hit “Where Da Cash At” the following year. Neither of those projects quite made him a star, so in 2007, Curren$y jumped ship to the independent digital-only Amalgam Records and rebranded himself as a niche underground artist with an ear for consistency. In 2011, Curren$y, a.k.a. Spitta, formed Jet Life, the label he’s used to launch some of his many, many, many projects. Free of major-label interference, Curren$y has amassed a massive discography that includes eight studio albums and more than 40 mixtapes. More importantly, he’s built a devoted fan base that comes to see him perform live year after year. Spitta’s not going to break streaming records like Drake, but he’s a dependable artist in an age of disposability.

Chance the Rapper: The Superstar Who Gives His Music Away
When Chance the Rapper picked up the Grammy for Best Rap Album in 2017, it was notable for two reasons. First off, Chance’s Coloring Book is an incredible collection of gospel-inflected hip-hop songs from an artist who speaks on social issues without getting preachy or forgetting that music is supposed to be fun. Second, Coloring Bookwas the first-ever streaming-only album nominated for a Grammy. While the Recording Academy didn’t change its eligibility rules specifically for Chance, the Chicago rapper had long been at the forefront of artists challenging traditional release models. Chance is the king of the free “mixtape” — that’s how he classified Coloring Book and its predecessors Acid Rap (2013) and 10 Day (2012). Fans were able to get their hands on all three totally free of charge, and that’s helped Chance grow a gigantic fan base that includes Barack Obama, who praised the MC in 2017 for “representing the kind of young people who come out of Chicago and change the world.” Although he’s avoided selling his music, Chance has earned so much money off touring and merchandise that he was able to donate $1 million to Chicago schools.

SOURCE: https://www.billboard.com/articles/partner/8467582/5-hip-hop-artists-that-went-against-industry-norms-to-achieve-success

Weekend Box Office: ‘The Predator’ Preying on ‘The Nun’ With $25M Bow

Elsewhere, Paul Feig’s ‘A Simple Favor’ is coming in ahead of expectations, while Matthew McConaughey’s crime-drama ‘White Boy Rick’ may not hit $10 million in its launch.

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Shane Black’s The Predator preyed on the competition at the Friday box office, earning $10.5 million from 4,037 theaters for a projected $25 million weekend debut.

The reboot, from Fox, may be coming in behind expectations, but it won’t have any trouble dethroning holdover The Nun, which is tumbling more than 65 percent in its second weekend to a projected $18.5 million. (The Nun is still a win for New Line and Warner Bros., considering its modest $22 million budget, and will finish Sunday with a domestic total of roughly $85 million.)

The Predator reboot opens more than 30 years after the first Predator, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger as the leader of an elite military team fighting off a menacing extra-terrestrial, hit the big screen. This time out, Boyd Holbrook, Trevante Rhodes, Olivia Munn, Jacob Tremblay, Keegan-Michael Key, Thomas Jane, Alfie Allen and Sterling K. Brown star as the Predator-battling gang.

Box-office observers don’t believe that the male-fueled film is being hurt by the controversy that erupted last week when word broke that Fox cut a scene after Munn informed the studio that an actor and acquaintance of Black’s with a small role in the movie, Steven Wilder Striegel, was a registered sex offender.

Critics haven’t been kind to the film, while audiences gave it a lowly C+ CinemaScore (two of the previous films in the series likewise earned some variation of a C grade).

Elsewhere, Paul Feig’s new neo-noir-comedy A Simple Favor is doing better business than expected, grossing an estimated $6 million on Friday from 3,102 theaters for a projected $16 million-plus debut. Starring Anna Kendrick, Blake Lively and Henry Golding of Crazy Rich Asians fame, the Lionsgate release is a marked departure for Feig, the filmmaker behind such comedic romps as Bridesmaids.

A dark tale about toxic friendships and the underside of suburbia, Simple Favor, earning a B+ CinemaScore, follows a mommy vlogger (Kendrick) who tries to uncover the truth behind the disappearance of her best friend (Lively) with the help of her BFF’s husband (Golding). What emerges is a tale of betrayal, secrets, revelations, love, loyalty, revenge and murder.

Matthew McConaughey is also gracing the big screen this weekend in filmmaker Yann Demange’s White Boy Rick. From Jeff Robinov’s Studio 8, the crime drama earned $3.5 million on Friday for a projected debut of $9.2 million. The awards hopeful received a mediocre B CinemaScore.

Set in 1980s Detroit at the height of the crack cocaine epidemic, White Boy Rick is based on the real-life story of the teenage son of a blue-collar father who became an undercover police informant and later a drug dealer before being abandoned by his handlers and sentenced to life in prison. Newcomer Richie Merritt stars opposite McConaughey.

The weekend’s other new pic, the faith-based Unbroken: A Path to Redemption is struggling to hit $3 million in its debut, despite being the only one of the four new films to be graced with an A CinemaScore. Playing in 1,602 locations, the movie is a “spiritual” successor, or sequel, to Angelina Jolie and Universal’s Unbroken. This time out, faith-based distributor Pure Flix is in charge of the film’s release.

Path to Redemption draws from the second half of Laura Hillenbrand’s best-selling book Unbroken and recounts what happened when Louis Zamperini (Samuel Hunt) returned home after surviving 47 days on a life raft only to be captured and tortured for two years at a Japanese POW camp. The pic chronicles Zamperini’s conversion to evangelical Christianity — which saves his marriage — after attending a Billy Graham revival. Will Graham portrays his late minister grandfather in the movie.