Day: December 11, 2012

Basketball Wives LA Reunion Season 2

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Ball Wives, LA Reunion Season 2, a display of buffoonery, reality show maddness, where women are being displayed as catty, back stabbing, calling each bitc..hes, etc. And we wonder why African-American women have challenges in Hollywood. Being objective what do you think? Is this perpetuating positivity or negativity? What can we do and have better programming for women to identify themselves with?

EBONY Profiled by The New York Times

D_Rogers_and_L_J_Rice_small_article-small_20616Desiree Rogers, the C.E.O. of Johnson Publishing,which owns the magazines Ebony and Jet, and Fashion Fair, a makeup line aimed at women of color, can see many sights from her 21st-floor corner office across from Millennium Park. “This is a good view of Chicago,” Ms. Rogers told a recent visitor, gesturing at a panorama of Lake Michigan, Grant Park, Navy Pier, the Adler Planetarium and Soldier Field. But the sight that holds the most personal meaning for Ms. Rogers may be a portrait by Robin Harper just above her purple retro sofa, depicting the boxer Jack Johnson with a soft, wounded expression. The portrait, Ms. Rogers said, reminded her of looking at pictures of Muhammad Ali in the pages of Ebony with her grandfather as a little girl growing up in New Orleans. “My grandfather really liked fighters,” she said. As they flipped through the magazines, she said, he’d tell her: “I hope you’re great. And I hope one day you’ll be in those pages.” Ms. Rogers, 53, has been in the pages of Ebony many times since her first appearance in April 1989 in a photo from George H. W. Bush’s inauguration. Her name now sits atop the magazine’s masthead, just below that of her best friend, Linda Johnson Rice, chairwoman of the company. CONTINUE READING..

Pepsi Backlash: Does Beyoncé Have A Responsibility To Endorse Healthy Products?


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Late yesterday evening, Beyoncé revealed a preview from her Pepsi commercial, set to air after the Pepsi-sponsored Super Bowl half-time show on February 3, 2013, which she is headlining. Beyoncé’s Pepsi commercial is a part of a $50 million dollar deal which names her the global brand ambassador to the brand and includes limited-edition cans, which show a pop art-inspired outline of her fully made-up face. The ad campaign will coincide with the release of new music from the superstar. Of the high profile collaboration, the singer, who has already appeared in four Pepsi ad campaigns, said: “Pepsi embraces creativity and understands that artists evolve. As a businesswoman, this allows me to work with a lifestyle brand with no compromise and without sacrificing my creativity.” Reactions have been mixed. Fans view the campaign as a momentous accomplishment for the singer, while others chide Beyoncé for supporting a sugary-soda brand which is a health affront to many American consumers. They even accuse the diva of hypocrisy for appearing in Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” initiative to encourage good health among children and later, shelling Pepsi cans. One commenter said: “Parkinson’s, heart disease, obesity, stroke and Alzheimer’s tincture. Another celebrity getting paid to keep America on their mainline like heroine. I respectfully decline supporting this travesty.” Another writes: “With diabetes and other ailments at an all time high, one would wonder why celebrities who claim to care so much about their fans would endorse soda. Almighty dollar.” While Pepsi isn’t great for your health, is it Beyoncé’s responsibility to make sure America drinks less soda?

What are your thoughts, Clutchettes? Should Beyoncé only endorse products that promote good health?